Jumpstart 2018 with Education

Face it. Those brain cells need refreshing. They’ve been hard at work on your work-in-progress, and they need a fresh focus so they can rejuvenate.

Our own G.B. Pool will appear at the Glendale Central Library with author Mike Belefer to teach a short story workshop on January 20th.  anatomy-book-cover

If you aren’t in the area, you can find Gayle’s Anatomy of a Short Story Workbook on Amazon.

Hope to see you there!


Gayle and Mike



A Boost Up!

By Jackie Houchin

Boost up2“A boost up”….when someone holds their clasped hands together next to a horse, and you put your foot in like a stirrup, and they propel you upward into the saddle.


Sometimes a beginner (or lazy) writer needs a boost up into the writing saddle.  That’s where The Write Practice came into the picture for me. (I’m one of those lazy ones!)

The Write Practice

”If you want to become a better writer, you need to practice,” says Joe Bunting, creator of The Write Practice organization and blog. What’s involved? Fifteen minutes a day, five days a week, practicing with fresh writing prompts, unique lessons on technique, and getting feedback from a supportive community.

There are over 1000 practice exercises and lessons on the blog in such categories as; better writing, genre & format, characterization, grammar, journalism, plot & story, writers block, inspirational writing, publishing, and blogging. And it’s free.  http://thewritepractice.com/about/

I’ve attempted two lessons so far in the Short Story category. The first lesson was to read at least six short stories from the many magazine links supplied. The second lesson was to free-write for at least 15 minutes, post what you wrote in the comments section, read three of what other people wrote, and give them brief feedback.  Simple as that; practice writing and give feedback. It’s really the basis for everything Bunting does.

I wrote a short ditty on ‘Pig, Porcupine & Pineapple.’  It was totally fun!  Now to see with my fellow writers say about it

The Becoming Writer Community & Challenge

 If you are ready to go to the next level and start writing finished pieces (and get published), then the Becoming Writer community is the next step. Bunting compares this with what the “Inklings were for Tolkien and C.S. Lewis, the expats in Paris were for Hemingway, and the Bloomsbury group was for Woolf.”

I discovered Becoming Writer because membership in it (yes, it does cost a little) was a requirement to submit to The Write Practice’s quarterly short story writing contest. But what you get with membership is a lot more than the contest.

Like the free practice lessons above, you share your writing with a community of writers to get and give feedback.  Actually giving feedback on another’s work helps you when it comes time to edit your own piece.

The Challenge is to write ONE piece EACH WEEK, submitted on Fridays.  It can be a short story, blog post, poem, essay, or a chapter in a book.  This is what us “lazy” writers call accountability.

And finally, besides actually finishing your pieces (Yay!), you get opportunities to submit to magazines like Short Fiction Break, Wordhaus and others.

The feedback on my first piece, an essay I wrote about Africa, brought a suggestion for submission to a specific online magazine. I submitted it and am waiting to hear.  http://thewritepractice.com/members/join

The Fall Contest

This is what caught my attention at first, a writing contest that promised cash prizes, free books, and publication. The theme was “Let’s Fall in Love.” Stories had to contain the two elements FALL and LOVE and be no longer than 1,500 words.  I told myself, “I can do that.”

The name “Autumn Gold” sprang to my mind and I quizzed my writer friends on Facebook as to how a girl with that name might look. The first answer – a stripper – caused me to cringe because that’s not what I had in mind. But when another person confirmed what he said, it left no doubt.

The story I eventually wrote keeps the title “Autumn Gold,” but the girl’s name is Audrey Gould.  I wrote an outline of sorts, showed it to a friend for her opinion, and then pounded out a story about LOVE that takes place in AUTUMN. It was 1,948 words. Lots of cuts and edits later, I submitted it to the Becoming Writer Contest community.

For the contest (548 entrants) the community is divided into ten groups, A–J, with about 40-50 writers in each. I landed in Group D. There are 46 of us, and we’ve become a close-knit group.

I’ve gotten about nine feedbacks on “Autumn Gold,” and I’ve given at least many more on other stories.  Some are VERY good! Others will need some work.  Reading my story’s feedback and the feedback on the other stories has opened my eyes to what works and what doesn’t, and what readers “get” from what you write, even if it’s not what you intended.


I’m considering rewriting the ending and running it past them one more time. The final deadline to submit the story to the judges is September 4.

Other Programs

The Write Practice offers other programs for writers and authors on building a platform, publishing & marketing, Twitter, and the 100 Day Book challenge.  http://thewritepractice.com/products


Now I’m up in the saddle. I’m trotting around and loving it. I can’t wait to press my calves against my steed’s sides and rise into a canter.  I needed that boost up.  Do you?  Perhaps you should consider a writing community.

I suggest The Writing Practice. Take advantage of the discipline and the getting and giving of feedback.  Pick the lessons you are interested in and go for it. They are free! You might also consider Becoming Writer.

Or join a critique group and begin giving your work over to new eyes and opinions.

Get up there and get galloping!


Currently the Becoming Writer and the 100 Day Book programs are closed until next semester.  Future contests in Becoming Writer will be on Flash Fiction, Essay writing, Novels, and Poetry.








The Long and Short of the Short Story

by Gayle Bartos-Pool


typewriterAfter writing my first three published short stories, something happened: Readers responded favorably to one of my characters. They liked this guy’s personality.


Of course a writer is supposed to craft memorable characters, but those are usually found in a novel. A writer has more room to flesh out characters in a 300-page novel, not a 25-50 page short story. But something was happening with my “Johnny Casino” character. His personality was too big to stay within 28 pages.


That’s when I realized I had more Johnny Casino stories in me. In fact, by the time I was finished, I had nine stories and 388 pages. That’s called a book. I had turned a one-shot story into what is basically a series.


But the journey was also a learning experience.


I wrote a batch of these stories and showed them to my agent. She liked them, but…she wanted more information about Johnny. She thought the stories needed a love interest, but I didn’t want the short stories bogged down with schmaltz. That wasn’t what I envisioned for my character. But I hadn’t written any reason why Johnny didn’t have a woman in his life, so I wrote a backstory. That’s when I learned a lot of new things about him. It was so detailed; it turned into the second story in the first collection, The Johnny Casino Casebook 1 – Past Imperfect.past-imperfect-cover-12

The backstory also gave me a different view of Johnny. He had his dark side as well as his sarcastic side. He was becoming a three-dimensional person. I started learning so much about him, more stories popped up. One was so compelling; it became the focal point of the second collection, The Johnny Casino Casebook 2 – Looking for Johnny Nobody.


Since I had created a past for Johnny, I could write stories about him when he worked for the mob back in New Jersey when he was younger; after all, I had discovered that his father was a high ranking guy in the D’Abruzzo crime family. I could also do a story explaining how he became a private detective after he fled to California.



And here’s a heads up for all you multi-tasking short story/novel writers. The character I created who taught Johnny how to be a first class P.I. is the heroine in another mystery series I have been writing. I figured, if people like Johnny, they just might like the novel featuring Gin Caulfield. She is now in three novels, not short stories in this case.


The last thing I learned on this journey is that there is a different kind of short story out there. In classes I teach about The Anatomy of a Short Story I mention a short story is like an hors d’oeuvre. It consists of a few really good things served up in a small bite. Whether it’s a handful of cool characters in a terrific location involved in a catchy plot, the short story gets you to one location in the fastest way possible.


In contrast, a novel can take you far and wide with a cast of thousands with sub-plots and bits of interesting background stuff just for the fun of it, and the writer can use 300 to 400 pages to accomplish the task. But the short story writer has to chop out unnecessary characters, places, plot twists and trim down the description to its bare bones and do it in 10 to 25 pages, give or take. Or does he?


I think there is a new home for the short story. The Short Story Novel. The length of each individual story can be anywhere from 25 to 70 pages, but the main thing is to have a single set of characters, or in my case, one main character, in every story. Several characters make repeat appearances, and I mention one sub-plot in several of the earlier stories in any given collection that is resolved in a story of its own. Each story reveals more and more about my main character and the final story in Book One ends with a haunting question that will be answered in Book Two.


If this sounds like a television series, you betcha. I called it a “series” earlier in this blog and that is exactly how I visualize The Johnny Casino Casebook, whether it stays in book form or hits the TV screen. His stories might be in the “short story” format, but his entire life is a novel.


And for those of you who prefer to create something completely stand-alone in each short story you write, those individual tales can always be put into your own collection and published. I did just that in From Light TO DARK.

The Play’s the Thing – Plot is Everything - Some thoughts by Gayle Bartos-Pool

Second Chance Book CoverAnd to add one more thing to this blog, Johnny Casino isn’t the only short story character to be in a book of his own. Chance McCoy arrived this year. His first book is called Second Chance. There are more stories to come. And there is a second short story anthology called Only in Hollywood coming out next year. The book consists of various stand-alone stories, but one features a guy named Charles Miro, a former TV actor turned private eye. He works for a younger woman who owns the detective firm. There are several stories about these two coming up. You see, even a short story can magically turn itself into a book if you try.

Write on.

Only in Hollywood cover 2



Have you ever tried to get a story accepted into a writing contest or juried anthology? Wouldn’t it be advantageous to have a confidential resource who can give you a competitive edge? If so, then read on because I am going to share with you my secrets for getting your work published.

First, some background. Several years ago, I tried to get a short story accepted into a Sisters In Crime anthology. I wrote what I thought was a good story that fit the theme and technical requirements. I ran it though a few critique groups to help me polish it. When I got the notification that the piece wasn’t accepted, I was heartbroken. I made it my mission to get my work accepted into the following anthology. The result: my story “By Anonymous” made it into Last Exit To Murder, published two years later. I succeeded in more ways than one; having a story in a prestigious anthology helped me win a publishing contract for my novels.

The experience taught me that it takes a lot more than just writing a good story to get your work into a competitive publication.


It’s hard enough to figure out what editors will consider ‘good’ or worthy of publication, but it’s even harder when they don’t clearly define what they want. If getting published is your goal, your odds are always better with a single genre competition and a clearly defined theme. Focus on competitions with a limited scope. ‘Stories under 500 words’ is vague , but ‘Heartwarming stories about rescued animals’ is more specific.


Every contest or anthology will issue submission guidelines that contain vital information. Guidelines begin with an explanation of what the stories should contain or be about. For example, mystery anthologies generally want stories that include at least one murder or serious crime. If there is a theme, the guidelines will often state how the theme should be incorporated. Remember: the more specific the requirements, the easier it is to figure out what the editors want. Pay attention to technical information such as word count, page set-up, method of submission, and deadline for entries. Take that information seriously; consider them demands, not requests.


Writing contests and anthologies are often sponsored by established organizations. Unless the sponsor is new, go back and read their previous publications. Determine what type of writing appeals to them. If everything they’ve published is dark, obscure and literary, your hilarious page-turner probably won’t get accepted. If the mysteries tend to be cozy, save your gruesome piece for another publication.

The sponsor’s website can provide invaluable help. Search online for any information about the selection process or editing of past competitions. I read through the Sisters In Crime L.A. website archives and located an old interview with the editors of an earlier anthology. All of them agreed that stories about previously unknown aspects of the city were more interesting than those that focused on familiar places and events. The anthology selections supported that. Which brings me to the next point:


If the theme is U.S. landmarks, leave the most popular choices to ‘Family Feud’ and go with something less familiar. There are two reasons for this: First, many writers will select something famous like the Hollywood sign or the Statue of Liberty. Since editors may want one story based on that location there’s more competition. Or they might get bored reading story after story about the same place and reject them all. Secondly, as already stated, stories about unknown or unusual places and events appeal to editors. Think how omnipresent the White House has been in films, but we vividly remember Mt. Rushmore in “North by Northwest” or Devil’s Tower in “Close Encounters of the Third Kind” because they stand out due to their uniqueness.


Everything I’ve shared with you so far will give any writer a competitive edge. The rest is up to you, though. You have to write a unique story. Start early, as soon as the announcement comes out. Brainstorm a few possible themes and work on them until you have a strong idea for a story. Take every advantage you have. I submitted one story to that first anthology although two submissions were permitted. For the next anthology, I finished my story months in advance and decided to write another before the deadline. I’m glad I did; the first piece was rejected, but the second one made it into the anthology.

Will any of my tips guarantee your story will get published? Of course not, but I assure you it will increase your chances of success. Good luck!



DEAD MICE, An African Tale – Turning Experiences Into Stories

By Jackie Houchin

In last week’s Writers in Residence blog post, Gayle Bartos-Pool asked the question, “What do I bring to the party?”  She went on to tell of her extensive and varied experiences and personal contacts that have helped in research for her detective and spy novels. It got me to thinking about what I “bring to the party” of my story writing.

(1) I have a good knowledge of the Bible. (2) I’ve been on three short-term mission trips to Malawi, Africa. (3) I have 3 granddaughters who were once little and to whom I told and wrote many stories. (4)  I teach the 4th-6th grade Sunday School class at church and I occasionally help in the K-2nd grade Junior Church.

What a set up for writing children’s stories that take place in Africa and that have a Bible truth woven into them. Hey! That’s just what I am doing. I write the “Missionary Kids Stories” series (about a family serving in Malawi) and I send them out to about a dozen young kids (6-11) at church via email every 1-2 weeks. They are entertaining (according to  the kids) informative about Africa and mission life (occasionally gross as in the story that follows), “safe” (one mom’s comment), and have truths from the Bible as a take away.

Here is the first one I sent out, introducing the family and setting up the series. It is the shortest and simplest one. The stories vary in age level depending on the MK (Missionary Kid) who is telling the story. Stories five and six – told by a teenager – is one story in two parts with a cliff hanger at the end of five.

Dead Mice


 These stories are about the (make-believe) Matthews Family, who went to Malawi, Africa about eight years ago to be missionaries.  This family has a dad and a mom, and seven children (three boys and four girls including a set of twins). As part of their names, each of them has the month that they were born in as a first or middle name, like Melody May or April Grace.  All of the stories are written to you as letters.  The first story starts like this: 

Hi kids!

My name is Melody May, and I have a twin sister whose name is Charity June. I also have three brothers and two more sisters. We all have the month we were born in as part of our names. It’s really cool I think, but some people think it’s weird.

My mom – her name is Mrs. Matthews – is really fun and creative. She picks out all our names. My dad – his name is Mr. Matthews – just smiles at her with love and agrees to the names.

People call me Melody, but they call my twin sister “June.” You may wonder how twins could be born in two different months. Can you guess how? It’s kind of tricky.

I’ll let my brothers and sisters tell you about themselves in other letters, but right now, let me tell you about what happened to my sister June and I a week ago.

We are MKs (Missionary Kids) who live in Malawi, Africa. Our dad is a college teacher at the African Bible College. We go to a school there too, but in a different building.

One day, an African boy in our class showed us a mouse… a really DEAD mouse. Then he dared us to do something with it. At first June and I refused, but then…..

Here’s how it happened.

The boy’s name is Kukana (Koo-KAH-nah). On that day, the first day of the new school year, he dared us to EAT a dead mouse! Ewww! Would YOU eat a mouse, especially a dead one? (I guess a live one would be worse!)

There are kids from America and Canada and Holland and South Africa in my class. There are many Malawian kids too. We have three grades in our classroom because, well, our teacher is very smart and can teach three grades at once! At least that’s what I think.

That day, when Kukana stood up in class with a closed box and told us he brought something for us to eat, we all smiled. We thought it might be some roasted peanuts, or those small super-sweet bananas they grown in Malawi. Yum.

Then he opened the box and reached in and held up this really stiff, black, hairy thing.  Some of the new girls screamed, but June and I didn’t. We almost did, but we grabbed each other’s hands and squeezed real tight.

“This is a mbewa,” he told us.

(You say mbewa like this – mmmmm-BEE-wah.)

“They are very tasty to eat,” Kukana said.

Then he held the mbewa up high by the stiff tail, tilted his head back, put the old dead mouse’s head into his mouth… and crunched it off!!!!!  He smiled big as he chewed it. The Malawian boys cheered and stomped their feet!

Our teacher frowned a little, but she didn’t say anything.

Kukana smiled again, real big, and there were little bits of black fur in his teeth!  He leaned very close to June and me and showed us his icky tongue, trying to scare us, I think.

Then he ate the rest of it….. even the tail. There were more hoots from the boys, and this time Mrs. Molenaar said, “Okay. That’s enough. Now tell the class about mbewa. Why did you bring it – and eat it?”

Mrs. Molenaar knew about mbewa – we could tell by her look – but she wanted Kukana to explain about this “famous Malawian snack food.”

“We eat mbewa because it’s good protein food,” began Kukana.

June and I looked at each other, our eyebrows raised way up and our eyes got big. OUR family eats  eggs, chicken, fish, and sometimes pork or beef for protein.

Kukana went on, “Village families here in Malawi are very poor. They raise goats and sometimes cows to SELL but not to EAT. They do this to have money for beans and maize to eat, and seeds to plant.”

I thought about what else OUR family eats. We like the beans, tomatoes, pumpkins, and peanuts that the villagers grow. We also eat yogurt and canned fruit and oatmeal. Sometimes Mom cooks nsima (nnnnnn-SEE-mah) which is made from white corn, called maize, and tastes like thick hot cereal without any salt. (Mom adds some for us.) Poor Malawians eat that every day. Sometimes that is all they HAVE to eat.

“There’s LOTS of mbewa around,” said Kukana. “You just have to catch them. We go to where old maize stalks or dead grass is piled up. We stand around the pile with sticks. Then someone lifts up the pile with a long pole and mice run out everywhere.  We have a lot of fun killing them with our sticks!”

Kukana laughed and all the boys laughed too.

“Then we put five or maybe ten of them on a long stick and roast them.”

Kukana looked right at June and me, opened his eyes really big and added, “….just… like… your… marshmallows!” Then he laughed in a mean way.

That made us feel mad and scared and icky, but we didn’t do anything. I think it was then, that I started to think….. maybe I WILL eat a dead mouse!

Mrs. Molenaar gave Kukana a stern look and he finished his talk like this. “Sometimes our fathers burn off the maize stubble (old stalks) in our fields. Then all the people stand around the edge of the field to catch the mice that run out.”

Mrs. Molenaar told the rest of it. “After the mice are roasted, which dries out the bodies but doesn’t burn off all the fur, they will keep for quite a while. Maybe you American children have tried jerky. It’s a bit like that.”

She turned to Kukana. “Did you want to share your mbewa with the class?”

He walked through the desks with the box down low. All the Malawian boys and girls took one out and started crunching and chewing. One American boy, named Benji took one too.

When the box came to June and me, my sister leaned way back, but I….. I reached in, grabbed a stiff hairy burned mouse and took it out.  Before I could think about what I was doing, I leaned back, held the thing up, and crunched off its head!!!!!!

This time June DID scream. “Melody! Noooo!! You are going to get sick and die!! And Mom will be very mad!”

I didn’t look at her. I stared at Kukana as I chewed the prickly, scratchy thing. It tasted kind of like burnt peanut shells and grease to me. Finally I swallowed it and stuck out my black-specked tongue to prove I ate it.

Kukana was surprised. He smiled at me (nicely, this time) and gave a little nod.  After that, he didn’t tease June and me. He kind of respected me, and since I was usually with my sister, he didn’t dare tease her either. After a while we even became friends.

Let me tell you a secret now. I didn’t finish the dead mouse.  I passed it to the boy behind me who snatched it up and ate it.

And you know what else?  I didn’t get sick and die.

I just became a Malawian.

But Mom DID get mad at me and told me never to do that again. I promised her that I wouldn’t. I figured I would never HAVE to do it again.

Later in our Sunday School class at the International Bible Fellowship church where my Dad sometimes preaches, I learned what Paul wrote in one of his letters in the Bible. He was a missionary to MANY countries. I don’t know if he ever had to eat mice, but he did say in 1 Corinthians 9:22, that he wanted to “become all things to all men that he might save some” for Christ.

I hope Kukana will someday want to know Jesus too. Maybe he will listen to me now when I tell him the gospel story ….. BECAUSE I ate the mouse.



~~ Facts ~~

          Malawians DO eat mice like this for protein. Sometimes you can see them along the road, selling mbewa still lined up in a row on the roasting sticks, or in piles on a piece of cloth they spread out on the ground. They also eat big grasshoppers for protein which they fry in oil and sprinkle with hot pepper. 

Tips from the 2015 California Crime Writers Conference, by Jackie Houchin

            AS A MEMBER of Sisters-in-Crime and Mystery Writers of America, I’ve attended all their combined conferences so far, and agree with everyone (even Anne Perry), this was the best one yet.  I love the camaraderie of fellow writers. I eagerly chat with them and sit in on their panel discussions. I commiserate with their anxieties and failures, celebrate their successes, and take note of the hard-earned tips they offer.
            The key note speakers – Southern belle, Charlaine Harris and British maven, Anne Perry – were the icing on the cake.
            I usually follow the “Craft” track because I’m a journalist with only an occasional dip into short stories. But the Industry, Forensics, and Marketing tracks were all well-attended, and for the first time this year CD recordings of each were made available for purchase.
            To order any of them, follow the links at http://vwtapes.com/sistersincrimewritersconference.aspx or contact Patrick Von Wiegnandt  at pvw@hawaii.rr.com.
NOTE: In order to be sure I did not misquote any of the authors from my scribbled notes, I listed their names on the panels, then used unattributed quotes. To hear just who said what (and more) check the CDs. 
“Addressing Fear and Other Plagues of the Writing Life” — Tyler Dilts, DJ Adamson, Terry Shames, Terri Nolan, moderator: Dennis Palumbo
            About anxieties for beginning new projects: “I let my alter self rant for about 3 minutes (maybe journal) then say ‘Shut up and get up.'” “Just get the words on the page. I do about 2,000 daily. When you have a draft the fear is gone.”
            About procrastination: “I do writing activities (email, etc.) other than writing on my book.” ” My kids say I’m circling the computer.” “I don’t call it procrastination, but preparation.”
“Thrills & Chills” —- Laurie Stevens, D.P. Lyle, Craig Faustus Buck, Paul D. Marks, moderator: Diana Gould
            About creating the elements of suspense: “I make characters sympathetic, then put them in jeopardy.” “Write thrillers only in 3rd person POV.” “Tell readers things the protagonist doesn’t know.” “Cliff hangers on most chapters.” ” Pace is critical.” “Short chapters.” “However, NEVER end the book with a cliff hanger.” “Don’t end chapters with ‘She had no idea what was coming’. It’s author intrusion.” ” I punch up violence in 2nd drafts.”
            About writing processes: “I do the 1st draft as a screenplay, an outline of sorts, I guess.” “I write the crime first, then write the psychological parts.” “When finished with the 1st draft, I do passes on what concerns me, like characters or pace.” “Anyone who doesn’t use Scrivener” is crazy!” http://bit.ly/1G5W0Q4
“Miss Marple’s Rules, Traditional Mysteries Today” —- Jill Amadio, Susan Shea, Gay Degani, Carole Sojka, moderator Susan Goldstein
            About labels and rules: “There’s more bloodshed in a Divorce Practice than in traditional mysteries.”  “Solving a puzzle. A whodunit.” “No graphic sex or violence, an amateur or private detective, justice rules in the end.” “Multiple suspects and a small town setting.” “Victims are usually odious people.” ” No killing animals, no harm to children.” Traditionals are more cerebral, more analytical of human behavior.”
            About changes in traditional mysteries:  “Technology, cell phones, the internet.” “The basics don’t change (structure, clues, a puzzle, suspects).” “Authors today like to break some rules along the way.” “Today’s world – travel, social settings – can work its way into mysteries.” “Less likely to stereotype (maids all the same, etc.).” “More humor.” “Some authors today like to have a niche, a “craft” of some kind in their mysteries (quilting, cooking, bookstores, tea shops).” “You can usually tell a niche-type cozy by its cover.”
            (A hot topic: Most in the audience said these types of popular mysteries were “cozies.” However publishers and book stores do not distinguish them from the more traditional (Miss Marple, Hercule Poirot) “whodunit” mysteries.  They refer to ALL traditional mysteries (niche or soft-boiled) as COZIES. Women in the audience, as well as the authors, thought this was a bad rap, because men are less likely to try soft-boiled traditional puzzle/sleuth mysteries if they think they are reading “cozies.”) 
            A question from a gentleman:  What is it about a woman liking to write mysteries?  “Women are more willing to listen to others.” “They are more apt to ask a lot of questions.” “Maybe they are more intuitive.”
“Short and Deadly” —- Bonnie Cardone, Andrew Jetarski, Gay Kinman, Donna May, moderator: Kate Thornton
            Why write short stories: “Immediate gratification.” “I was trying to make a living and had no time to write a novel.” “My first short story was the first chapter of my novel, slightly changed; the second one, the second chapter condensed. I wrote the third story on my own.” “Writing short stories was a way to put off writing my novel.”
            About the importance of Short Story anthologies:  “It’s how I began.” “I saw the announcement for submissions and thought ‘I know I can do that.'” “I wouldn’t be writing today without that opportunity. I like that when the theme is announced, everyone starts at the same time, no one has an advantage.”
            About short story markets:  “Anthologies, they get you started.” ” Kings River Life always needs themed stories.”  http://kingsriverlife.com/  “Duatrope.com has searchable databases for fiction and other genres.” https://duotrope.com/  “Woman’s World is another good place; very strict guidelines, but pay $500 for 500 words + a clue/question.” “Alfred Hitchcock & Ellery Queen magazines.” “Try joining the online group, Short Mystery Fiction Society, they even give Derringer Awards.”  
            About free or paid submissions”  “If you submit to non-paying markets, try to do it in places that give awards.” “I want them published before I put them into my own anthologies.” “You can put short stories on Amazon Kindle for 99c.” “Free to anthologies is good, it’s for a good cause.” “I introduce the characters in my novel in free short stories to see if people want to read about them” “Published (free) short stories can act as calling cards to other venues.”
            About regrets:  “I sold all the rights to an online market, then later when a film company wanted it, I couldn’t sell.” “I didn’t quite make the deadline on a story, then just let it go.” “I have a great story, but I can’t figure out the end!”
“Traveling Through Time, Historical Novels” —- Jessica Ferriday, Anne Cleeland, Ona Russell, Bonnie MacBird, moderator: Rosemary Lord
            About what started you writing historicals:  “Scrapbooks. Clippings of my husband’s grandfather who was a judge in the 1920s. When I researched him, I found a wonderful Jewish woman who worked in the courts, perfect as my protagonist.” “I have Sherlock Holmes and the Victorian Era in my blood.” “I love linguistics and languages. My stories are in 1890s London.” “I love Regency novels. You’re supposed to write what you read, so I write 1814 Jane Austin.”
            About the language and style of historical speech: “I was trained as an actor, I learned to mimic. I listen to a CD every morning before writing.” “I get British people to vet my writing for Americanisms.”
            About research facts: “I  realized everything moved a lot slower (communications, travel, etc.)” “Hats! No one wears hats today.” “They had more ways to entertain themselves with each other – singing, instruments, dancing, storytelling.)”
“Putting Your Blog to Work” —- Sybil Johnson, Patty Smiley, S.W. Lauden, moderator Mar Preston
            About expectations of a blog:  “I’m a member of a multiple author blog (MAB), so there’s no pressure to write a post every day or week.” “When I hung up my shingle as a writer, I created a place for other to find what I’m doing – opinion , author interviews, short stories to music videos.”
            About blogging to sell your books: “If I don’t, people won’t buy my books.” “I create a voice and style, but a blog won’t make you famous.” “I’ve gained readers.” “I announce my books on FaceBook and Twitter, but never talk about my books on the blog. I have conversations with people there.”
            About writing that blog post:  “We write from 1,500 – 6,000  words.” (WOW!) “I write 400-1,000 words.” “Begin your blog as if beginning a thriller.” “Offer content about YOU, your life, funny and entertaining stuff, not just about writing.” “Ask, ‘Would people care to read this?'” “Respond to comments.” “Make blogs visually attractive. Use photos and graphics. I imbed videos and book covers, use pull quotes. Use fewer words: people see a wall of text and don’t stay.” “Pay attention to ‘Keywords’ for your posts. Choose them carefully.”
            About all those blog hits from other countries:  “Creepy.” “How? Why?”  (An answer from an audience member cleared this up. The International Institute of English encourages their students to find blogs by using keywords. They print them out and use them to study English and English/American idioms; reading and rewriting them.)
            About getting started and keeping going:  “Join a MAB, or guest post on one.” “Write a dynamic essay.” “Keep a list of things that are happening to you, choose the interesting ones.”
Keynote speakers
            From Charlaine Harris: How long does it take to churn out a book?  As long as your editor says. Being a writer means completing the book. It’s a business. If you don’t sell, you’ll be cut. No, I don’t outline. Outlining makes me feel like painting by numbers. I write maybe 250 words about the book, then get to it.  My biggest challenge? Personal malice towards me!  Sweet me!
            From Anne Perry:  Do you ever wonder why crime writers are such nice people? If we really don’t like you, there are other things we can do with you. The great thing about being a writer is that you are allowed (expected) to be eccentric. You can write your mysteries about anything you like, as long as there are the elements of crime and somebody to solve it. (Photo: with Rosemary Lord)
Keynotes discuss Elmore Leonard’s 10 Rules of Writing, Moderator Craig Faustus Buck
Harris and Perry agreed with most of Leonard Elmore’s famous “Ten Rules of Writing,” with exceptions.  “It depends…” prefaced many of their answers, and then they often explained how they broke that rule! Or avoided breaking it by using other means. A perfect wind-down to the conference. 
Sisters In Crime Anthology “LAdies Night” authors & editors —- Naomi Hirahara, Kate Thornton, Jeri Westerson (editors), Julie G. Beers, Julie Brayton, Sarah M. Chen, Arthur Coburn, L.H. Dillman, Bengte Evenson, Cyndra Gernet, Andrew jetarski, Micheal Kelly, Susan Kosar-Beery, Jude McGee, Gigi Pandian, Wendall Thomas